Fitness Tips with Chrissy Zmijewski: The Barbell Squat

Chrissy Zmijewski aka Goddess Athlete (www.GoddessAthlete.com) talks about proper knee tracking and range of motion for the barbell squat.

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29 comments
  1. supun pathum / September 12, 2013

    It would be a shame for you not to get ripped when these other people are
    able to build muscle easily with Morsch Muscle Madness (search for it on
    google).

  2. Chrissy Zmijewski / September 13, 2013

    Both are beneficial. Less weight and more range of motion is better for
    recruiting more muscle fibers and then you can challenge yourself by
    increasing the weight and doing a little less motion.

  3. Owen Lockwood / September 14, 2013

    Incredible physique

  4. nylotus / October 7, 2013

    I’m a female that’s 176, 5’10” and I can NOT add mass to my legs. I
    deadlift/barbell squat about 120, but it does nothing for me. I’m toned,
    but I can’t add mass at all. I was told that I should at least be able to
    squat my bodyweight. Any suggestions??

  5. Chrissy Zmijewski / October 14, 2013

    If you are trying to add mass, you need to push yourself working in the rep
    range from 6 to 20. Some days should be lighter with higher reps and other
    days heavier with lower reps. You may want to try daily undulating
    periodization model of training.

  6. nylotus / October 14, 2013

    Thanks!

  7. Marissah Wood / October 16, 2013

    Hi, I am a 19 yr old female that is 5’7″ and 130 pounds. I’m pretty toned
    from doing dance and volleyball in highschool, but i’ve lost alot of muscle
    mass in my legs and glutes from not lifting anymore. I want to get back
    into lifting and I know squats are beneficial but I don’t know how often I
    should squat, how many reps I should do, and how many sets. Any advice? I
    want to put muscle mass back on.

  8. nylotus / October 21, 2013

    Whether the reps are higher or lower, how many sets do you recommend? I
    usually do 3, but should I increase that?

  9. Chrissy Zmijewski / October 22, 2013

    If you are doing lots of other leg exercises, 3 sets should be sufficient.

  10. Chrissy Zmijewski / October 25, 2013

    Yes, lifting will help. You want to lift in the 6 to 15 rep range. 3 sets
    should be sufficient to start if you are doing other leg exercises

  11. yobolion / April 3, 2014

    Ideal depth! One of the best demos on Youtube! Back doesn’t round at the
    bottom! Save the back for old age!

    • Audrey Yun / November 6, 2014

      +futurealasd and you just believe them without finding out why or how? and
      you follow the HODGE TWINS?!? hahaha… oh man… all *I* can say is, it’s
      fine if you think differently just make sure you do all your proper
      research and always keep an open mind to new possibly conflicting
      information. doubt everything.

    • josephine ocallahan / November 7, 2014

      +futurealasd You’re wrong. Squatting lower places LESS shearing force on
      the knee joint. Really? A psychiatrist told you that? Maybe you’re unaware
      that psychiatrists specialize in mental illness, so maybe you shouldn’t be
      asking them about squat form. It’s a common (yet ignorant and pervasive)
      myth that squatting below 90 degrees is bad for the knees. The myth can be
      traced back to a study in 1961 by Dr. Karl Klein. Fortunately, we’ve come a
      long way since then and I invite you to educate yourself.

      Powerlifters who squat double their body weight to depths 130 degrees of
      knee flexion have been shown in countless studies to have more stable knee
      joints than individuals who do not squat at all. Furthermore, other studies
      have revealed that the knees of those who regularly squat deep are more
      stable than distance runners and basketball players. Forces on the ACL and
      PCL are reduced as the knee is flexed beyond 60 degrees, and reduced even
      more after 120 degrees. Please stop spreading ignorance.

    • futurealasd / November 7, 2014

      girl its so simple…look at people who work as builders…most of them
      have bad knee joints cause of the many years sitting too far low with their
      feet…

    • josephine ocallahan / November 9, 2014

      Again, those who squat twice their body weight generally have better knee
      joints than those who don’t squat at all. I’m not talking about roided-up
      body builders who don’t take care of their bodies and have no functional
      fitness. Clearly, you don’t have the ability to understand logic. Lost
      cause.

  12. Katie Doucet / September 1, 2014

    Squats 100 pounds – yeah sure no big deal O.O suuuure….. lol I hope to do
    that one day :)

    • MikeDunn / January 20, 2016

      +Katie Doucet
      that was 135. 🙂

  13. JLA / September 21, 2014

    I hate seeing comments that say not deep enough or wrong form. It’s in
    almost 100% of all the squat videos. She’s doing them correctly. Just do
    your lower weighted squats deep if you can’t on higher weights and work
    your way up.

    • QuiveringNow / June 11, 2015

      +JLA Well, the reason you see those comments is because a 90 degree angle
      is far from a full squat. Thus, not working the maximum amount of muscle
      fiber. Why do you hate seeing that pointed out?

  14. Jerry Anderson / October 2, 2014

    Great information, I’m going to use it tomorrow in my leg workout!

  15. Hexcelsus / February 26, 2015

    Thank you. Could you please explain the ammount of weights per set.. Do
    you add weight after each set of repetitions, or do each set with the same
    weight?

    • Chrissy Zmijewski / March 14, 2015

      It depends on your goals. You can do a pyramid with your weights & reps or
      you can do the same weight and reps each set.

  16. nguyenxuanmai / March 13, 2015

    You look so beautiful!!!!

  17. JONES534 / July 12, 2015

    good info about foot placement and knee tracking, but was disappointed when
    I saw your “range of motion”.

    • Chrissy Zmijewski / July 14, 2015

      I go as low as I can while maintaining proper form. Even without weight on
      my back, when I go too low, my lower spine cannot remain in a neutral
      position. There is no sense sacrificing my body just to get into a lower
      squat

    • JONES534 / July 14, 2015

      +Chrissy Zmijewski I watched another video of yours, you Squatted much
      lower, to the ankles…but you weren’t using any weigh, and facing a wall
      while doing the Squats. The Squat was a mean to an end for something
      else, which I can’t rememebr

    • Chrissy Zmijewski / July 14, 2015

      This video was shot years ago. I am able to now go much lower and maintain
      good form.

  18. Imogen Rose / August 4, 2015

    most incredible body i have ever seen :)

  19. mts2457 / December 9, 2015

    is what you did considered a ‘low bar’ squat?

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